Keynote Speaker

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Rigoberto Hernandez
Gompf Family Professor at Johns Hopkins University
Director of the Open Chemistry Collaborative in Diversity Equity (OXIDE)

Learn more about him at  rh.jhu.edu

Dr. Rigoberto Hernandez is the Gompf Family Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the Johns Hopkins University as of July 2016, and remains as the Director of the Open Chemistry Collaborative in Diversity Equity (OXIDE) since 2011. Before Hopkins, he was a Professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech, and Co-Director of the Center for Computational Molecular Science and Technology he co-founded. He was born in Havana, Cuba and is a U.S. Citizen by birthright. He holds a B.S.E. in Chemical Engineering and Mathematics from Princeton University (1989), and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley (1993). His research area can be broadly classified as the theoretical and computational chemistry of systems far from equilibrium. His current projects involve questions pertaining to the diffusion of mesogens in colloidal suspensions and liquid crystals, fundamental advances in transition state theory, design principles for sustainable nanotechnologies and the dynamics of protein folding and rearrangement, and the design of autonomous computing machines. This work is currently supported by the NSF through a single-investigator grant and the CCI Center for Sustainable Nanomaterials. The OXIDE effort is presently supported by the Sloan Foundation.

Dr. Hernandez is the recipient of a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award (1997), Research Corporation Cottrell Scholar Award (1999), the Alfred P. Sloan Fellow Award (2000), a Humboldt Research Fellowship (2006-07), the ACS Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences (2014), the CCR Diversity Award (2015), the RCSA Transformative Research and Exceptional Education (TREE) Award (2016),  the Herty Medal (2017), and the Stanley C. Israel Regional Award for Advancing Diversity in the Chemical Sciences (2018).  He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, 2004), the American Chemical Society (ACS, 2010), the American Physical Society (APS, 2011), and the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC, 2020). In 2015-2016, he was a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar. He previously served as the as the District IV Director on the American Chemical Society Board of Directors (2014-2019). He currently serves on the Research Corporation Scialog Selection Committee for Molecules Come to Life (2018-2020), the Sloan MPHD Advisory Committee and AAAS Committee on Opportunities in Science (COOS).